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19

Flame Robin

(Petroica phoenicea)
Alternate name(s): "Flame-breasted Robin", "Robin Redbreast*"
Size: 12.5-14 cm
Weight: 14 g (average)

Similar species

Description     Classification     Distribution     Sightings     Photos     Breeding     Nest     Eggs     Behaviour     Food     Call/s

Physical description

Click here for a physical description

Taxonomy, classification

See Flame Robin at Wikipedia .

Range, habitat, finding this species

Click here for information on habitat and range

Sightings

Click here for sighting information

Photos

ADULT

MALE

Frontal view of a male Flame Robin (photo courtesy of F. Japp)
[Falls Creek, VIC, September 2014]

Frontal view of a male Flame Robin (photo courtesy of R. Plumtree)
[Ensay South, East Gippsland, VIC, October 2013]

This frontal view of a male Flame Robin on the point of take-off gives a good view of the underwing pattern (photo courtesy of R. Plumtree)
[Ensay South, East Gippsland, VIC, July 2015]

Near-lateral view of a male Flame Robin (photo courtesy of C. Hayne)
[Little Llangothlin Lagoon NR, near Guyra, NSW, September 2013]

Lateral view of a male Flame Robin (photo courtesy of R. Plumtree); this photo shows how yellowish sunlight can lead to colour artefacts in a photograph, making the bird look yellow-orange, rather than flame-red
[Ensay South, East Gippsland, VIC, June 2015]

Dorsal view of a male Flame Robin (photo courtesy of R. Plumtree)
[Near Ensay, East Gippsland, VIC, January 2014]

FEMALE

Frontal view of a female Flame Robin (photo courtesy of C. Hayne)
[Little Llangothlin Lagoon NR, near Guyra, NSW, September 2013]

Lateral view of a female Flame Robin (photo courtesy of R. Plumtree)
[Near Ensay, East Gippsland, VIC, March 2014]

IMMATURE/JUVENILE

Near-frontal view of an immature male Flame Robin (photo courtesy of R. Plumtree)
[Ensay South, East Gippsland, VIC, October 2013]

Breeding information

Breeding season: Aug - Jan Eggs: 3 - 4 Incubation period: ca. 14 days Fledging age: ca. 15-16 days

Nest building: Female Incubation: Female Dependent care: Female & male

Nest

"bungobittah", "malunna" = nest [Aboriginal]

Type: Basket Material: Bark, webs; moss or lichen lining Height above ground: 0 - 20 m

Female Flame Robin on its nest (photo courtesy of R. Plumtree)
[Ensay South, East Gippsland, VIC, 2014]

Female Flame Robin peeking outside its nesting hollow in the stump of a broken-off major branch (photo courtesy of C. Hayne)
[Little Llangothlin Lagoon NR, near Guyra, NSW, September 2013]

Eggs

"boyanga", "booyanga", "derinya", "dirandil", "koomura", "ngampu", "nooluk", "pateena" = Egg; "dirundirri" = eggs [Aboriginal]; "gawu" = eggs [gamilaraay]

Size: 18 x 14 mm Colour: Creamy, with mid-brown speckles Shape: Tapered oval

Behaviour

Social behaviour: Territorial Mobility: Migratory Elementary unit: Individual/pair

Flame Robins can nest in very diverse places, on the ground, in shrubs, or high up in trees. They are the only robins known to us that will use a hollow for nesting. All other robins tend to build their nests in branches of trees/shrubs.

Food, Diet

Adults: Insects, including caterpillars Dependents: Like adults Water intake: ?

Female Flame Robin with its prey, in this case a fly (photo courtesy of C. Hayne)
[Little Llangothlin Lagoon NR, near Guyra, NSW, September 2013]

Female Flame Robin with its prey, a big, juicy caterpillar (photo courtesy of C. Hayne)
[Little Llangothlin Lagoon NR, near Guyra, NSW, September 2013]

These pages are largely based on our own observations and those of our contributors. The structure of these bird pages is explained HERE. For more salient facts on any bird species please refer to a field guide.

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