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9

Banded Lapwing

(Vanellus tricolor)
Alternate name(s): "Banded Plover", "Black-breasted Plover", "Flock Plover", "Plain Plover", "Tri-coloured Plover"
Aboriginal name(s): "kilkil" (WA); "kalli-jirr-jirr"

Size: 25-29 cm
Weight: 190 g (average)

Similar species

Description     Classification     Distribution     Sightings     Photos     Breeding     Nest     Eggs     Behaviour     Food     Call/s

Physical description

Click here for a physical description

Taxonomy, classification

See Banded Lapwing at Wikipedia .

Range, habitat, finding this species

Click here for information on habitat and range

Sightings

Click here for sighting information

Photos

ADULT

Frontal view of an adult Banded Lapwing
[Near Terry Hie Hie, NSW, July 2013]

Near-lateral view of a Banded Lapwing
[Near Terry Hie Hie, NSW, July 2013]

Near-lateral view of a Banded Lapwing; this bird was not walking, but pulling up one of its legs to rest
[Near Terry Hie Hie, NSW, July 2013]

Lateral view of a Banded Lapwing
[Burren Junction, NSW, December 2013]

Close-up dorsal view of a Banded Lapwing (photo courtesy of C. Charles)
[Diamantina River, QLD, August 2013]

Dorsal view of a Banded Lapwing
[Near Terry Hie Hie, NSW, July 2013]

Lateral view of a Banded Lapwing seen preening
[Near Terry Hie Hie, NSW, July 2013]

Banded Lapwing scanning the sky for raptors (photo courtesy of C. Hayne)
[Near Terry Hie Hie, NSW, July 2013]

Lateral view of a Banded Lapwing on a coastal sand dune
[Near Old Bar, NSW, September 2011]

Dorsal view of a Banded Lapwing on a beach
[Near Old Bar, NSW, September 2011]

Banded Lapwing looking back
[Near Old Bar, NSW, September 2011]

Banded Lapwings in flight, displaying their upperwing pattern (photo courtesy of C. Hayne)
[Near Moree, NSW, December 2012]

Banded Lapwings banking to land
[Near Burren Junction, NSW, December 2015]

Two Banded Lapwings in flight
[Goran Lake, NSW, August 2011]

More than 20 Banded Lapwings on the bank of an artificial dam
[Burren Junction, NSW, November 2013]

Close-up near-frontal view of a Banded Lapwing in captivity (photo courtesy of C. Hayne)

IMMATURE/JUVENILE

Lateral view of an immature Banded Lapwing dam
[Near Burren Junction, NSW, December 2015]

Breeding information

Breeding season: Jul - Jan Eggs: 3 - 5 Incubation period: ca. 26(?) days Fledging age: N/A

The breeding season listed in the table above relates to the southern part of the continent. In the North, Banded Lapwings breed in autumn. Given the right conditions, they can in principle breed any time of the year. Banded Lapwing chicks are precocial.

Nest building: Female & male Incubation: Female & male Dependent care: Female & male

Nest

"bungobittah", "malunna" = nest [Aboriginal]

Type: Scrape Material: Soil, rocks, some twigs Height above ground: N/A

Nest of a pair of Banded Lapwings, placed right near the end of the runway of a commercial airport (photo courtesy of R. Muilenburg)
[Ravensthorpe, WA, September 2015]

Eggs

"boyanga", "booyanga", "derinya", "dirandil", "koomura", "ngampu", "nooluk", "pateena" = Egg; "dirundirri" = eggs [Aboriginal]; "gawu" = eggs [gamilaraay]

Size: 42 x 31 mm Colour: Olive-grey, with dark grey-brown speckles Shape: Tapered oval

Close-up view of the three Banded Lapwing eggs in the nest shown above (photo courtesy of R. Muilenburg)
[Ravensthorpe, WA, September 2015]

Behaviour

Social behaviour: Territorial Mobility: Sedentary/dispersive Elementary unit: Pair

There is now a separate page describing the behaviour of a flock of 50 Banded Lapwings around a shallow puddle where they had found a temporary home in a fallow field.

We have seen Banded Lapwings associate with their larger cousins, Masked Lapwings.

People with decades of bird-watching experience report that in the past Banded Lapwings were the most common type of lapwing in inland NSW. These days their numbers have declined drastically, at least in north-west NSW, and the dominant species is now the Masked Lapwing. One possible explanation for this shift could be that Banded Lapwings prefer shorter grass than Masked Lapwings, which has become less abundant with the shift from sheep to cattle brought about by the decline in the price of wool.

Food, Diet

Banded Lapwing feeding on short grass growing alongside a dirt road
[Near Terry Hie Hie, NSW, July 2013]

This Banded Lapwing can find seeds in the red dirt of an outback air strip (photo courtesy of J. Greaves)
[350 km ENE of Kalgoorlie, WA, February 2012]

Call(s)/Song

For this species we have recorded the following call(s)/song. The interpretation of their meaning is our own; comments and suggestions for improvement are welcome.

bandlap_20151222.mp3 (NW NSW) Contact calls (in-flight) © MD
bandlap_20151222_4.mp3 (NW NSW) Warning/departure (flock) © MD
bandlap_20151222_3.mp3 (NW NSW) Various (in-flight) © MD
bandlap_20151222_2.mp3 (NW NSW) Various (in-flight) © MD

These pages are largely based on our own observations and those of our contributors. The structure of these bird pages is explained HERE. For more salient facts on any bird species please refer to a field guide.

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If interested, please CLICK HERE. Credits to contributors are given HERE.