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17

Striated Pardalote

(Pardalotus striatus)
Alternate name(s): "Striated Diamond-bird", "Pickwick", "Wittachew", "Chip-chip"; race "striatus": "Yellow-tipped Pardalote"; races "ornatus", "substriatus", "uropygialis": "Red-tipped Pardalote"; race "melanocephalus": "Black-headed Pardalote"
Aboriginal name(s): Race "substriatus": "bilyabit"*, "widopwidop"* (WA)

Size: 9.5-11.5 cm
Weight: 11 g (average)

Similar species

Description     Classification     Distribution     Sightings     Photos     Breeding     Nest     Eggs     Behaviour     Food     Call/s

Physical description

Click here for a physical description

Taxonomy, classification

See Striated Pardalote at Wikipedia .

Range, habitat, finding this species

Click here for information on habitat and range

Sightings

Click here for sighting information

Photos

Not the photos you want? Or are you after even better quality? Have a look here .

Race "striatus"

ADULT

Near-frontal view of a Striated Pardalote "striatus" (photo courtesy of B. Hensen)


[Peter Merrill Reserve, near Kingston, TAS, March 2016]

Race "substriatus"

ADULT

Near-frontal view of a Striated Pardalote "substriatus" (photo courtesy of J. Greaves)

Near-lateral view of a Striated Pardalote "substriatus" (photo courtesy of R. Druce)

Lateral view of the same Striated Pardalote "substriatus" (photo courtesy of R. Druce)

Close-up lateral view of a Striated Pardalote "substriatus" collecting nesting material
[Eulah Creek, NSW, December 2016]

Lateral view of a Striated Pardalote "substriatus" (photo courtesy of J. Greaves)

Lateral view of a Striated Pardalote "substriatus", now with its feathers ruffled (photo courtesy of J. Greaves)

Close-up dorsal view of a Striated Pardalote "substriatus"
[Deriah Aboriginal Area, NSW, March 2009]

Close-up dorsal view of a Striated Pardalote "substriatus" collecting nesting material
[Eulah Creek, NSW, December 2016]

View from beneath of a Striated Pardalote "substriatus"
[Flinders Ranges NP, SA, March 2008]

Different angle on the same Striated Pardalote "substriatus"
[Flinders Ranges NP, SA, March 2008]

Pair of Striated Pardalotes "substriatus" (photo courtesy of J. Greaves)

IMMATURE/JUVENILE

Immature Striated Pardalote "substriatus"
[February 2009]

Near-frontal view of an immature Striated Pardalote "substriatus"
[Flinders Ranges NP, SA, March 2008]

Near-dorsal view of an immature Striated Pardalote "substriatus"
[Flinders Ranges NP, SA, March 2008]

Race "ornatus"

ADULT

Frontal view of a Striated Pardalote "ornatus" (photo courtesy of I. Duncan)
[South West Rocks. NSW, September 2011]

Near-frontal view of a Striated Pardalote "ornatus"
[Coffs Harbour, NSW, August 2015]

Near-lateral view of a Striated Pardalote "ornatus"
[Coffs Harbour, NSW, August 2015]

Lateral view of a Striated Pardalote "ornatus" (photo courtesy of I. Duncan)
[South West Rocks. NSW, September 2011]

Lateral view of a Striated Pardalote "ornatus"
[Coffs Harbour, NSW, August 2015]

Lateral view of a Striated Pardalote "ornatus" with food for its chick; try as we might, we could not find the young bird that we heard responding to the adult's calls
[Dangars Lagoon, near Uralla, NSW, January 2011]

Race "melanocephalus"

ADULT

Frontal view of a Striated Pardalote (photo courtesy of C. Hayne)

Frontal view of a Striated Pardalote; this is the bird whose calls were recorded on 3 October 2015

Near-frontal view of a Striated Pardalote (photo courtesy of A. Ross-Taylor)
[Highland Park, Gold Coast, QLD, June 2013]

Frontal view of a Striated Pardalote calling
[Whittaker's Lagoon, NSW, June 2012]

Close-up near-lateral view of a Striated Pardalote (photo courtesy of M. Eaton)
[Anstead Reserve, Anstead, QLD, March 2017]

Near-lateral view of a Striated Pardalote (photo courtesy of C. Hayne)

Near-lateral view of a Striated Pardalote with its wings spread (photo courtesy of T. Allison)
[Mooloolah River NP, Sunshine Coast, QLD, June 2013]

Lateral view of a Striated Pardalote; this is the bird whose call was recorded on 10 April 2014 (photo courtesy of A. Ross-Taylor)
[Highland Park, Gold Coast, QLD, April 2014]

Dorsal view of the same Striated Pardalote as shown above (photo courtesy of A. Ross-Taylor)
[Highland Park, Gold Coast, QLD, April 2014]

Pair of Striated Pardalotes (photo courtesy of A. Ross-Taylor)
[Highland Park, Gold Coast, QLD, June 2013]

Striated Pardalote in flight, inspecting a house wall for potential prey (photo courtesy of A. Ross-Taylor)
[Highland Park, Gold Coast, QLD, June 2014]

Races "melanocephalus/substriatus"

In the area where we live, in inland north-western NSW, three races of Striated Pardalotes overlap: ornatus, substriatus and melanocephalus. This can lead to observations of hybrids, as shown here.

ADULT

Frontal portrait of a Striated Pardalote (photo courtesy of C. Hayne)
[Near Armidale, NSW, September 2013]

Frontal view of a Striated Pardalote; note how the black cap indicates race "melanocephalus", while the striated pattern around the eyes and the wing markings show the influence of race "substriatus"
[Deriah Aboriginal Area, NSW, May 2013]

Frontal view of a Striated Pardalote
[Eulah Creek, NSW, November 2010]

Near-frontal view of a Striated Pardalote
[Eulah Creek, NSW, May 2012]

Near-frontal view of a Striated Pardalote ; again the black cap indicates race "melanocephalus", while the striated pattern around the eyes and the wing markings show the influence of race "substriatus"
[Eulah Creek, NSW, August 2011]

Lateral view of a nosy Striated Pardalote
[Eulah Creek, NSW, May 2012]

Lateral view of a Striated Pardalote
[Eulah Creek, NSW, August 2011]

Lateral view of a Striated Pardalote (photo courtesy of C. Hayne)
[5 km east of Armidale, NSW, September 2013]

IMMATURE/JUVENILE

Immature Striated Pardalote melanocephalus/substriatus
[January 2008]

Immature Striated Pardalote approaching a waterhole
[Deriah Aboriginal Area, NSW, January 2009]

Lateral view of a juvenile Striated Pardalote; one can see that the bird's plumage is still downy
[Eulah Creek, NSW, December 2012]

Lateral view of a juvenile Striated Pardalote from underneath
[Deriah Aboriginal Area, NSW, December 2012]

Juvenile Striated Pardalote begging for food
[Eulah Creek, NSW, February 2009]

Race "uropygialis"

ADULT

MALE

Frontal view of a male Striated Pardalote "uropygialis"; note the characteristic dark-orange patch in front of the eye (photo courtesy of B. Hensen)
[Mareeba Wetlands, QLD, July 2013]

Frontal view of a male Striated Pardalote "uropygialis"; slightly different posture (photo courtesy of B. Hensen)
[Mareeba Wetlands, QLD, July 2013]

Lateral view of a male Striated Pardalote "uropygialis"; note the characteristic dark-orange patch in front of the eye (photo courtesy of B. Hensen)
[Casuarina Coastal Reserve, Darwin, NT, March 2013]

Breeding information

Breeding season: Aug - Jan Eggs: 3 - 4 Incubation period: 14 - 16 days Fledging age: ca. 21 - 28 days

These two Striated Pardalotes are getting "into the mood"
[Eulah Creek, NSW, June 2012]

Lateral view of a Striated Pardalote collecting nesting material (photo courtesy of C. Hayne)
[5 km east of Armidale, NSW, September 2013]

Nest

"bungobittah", "malunna" = nest [Aboriginal]

Type: Tunnel or hollow with basket Material: Bark strips, grass Height above ground: 0 - 10 m

Striated Pardalotes not only build their own nests, but have also been observed by us recycling other species' nests. Usually they use horizontal branches, but also various substitutes, such as pipes.

There is a separate page describing the dissection of a Striated Pardalote nest.

Two Striated Pardalotes investigating the potential of a steep bank for building a nest
[Eulah Creek, NSW, May 2012]

Striated Pardalote "substriatus" collecting nesting material (photo courtesy of C. Hayne)
[Mt. Kaputar NP, NSW, July 2013]

Threads of palm leaves (although not native to Australia) are highly appreciated by many species, including Striated Pardalotes, as material for lining their nests
[Eulah Creek, NSW, August 2011]

Close-up lateral view of a Striated Pardalote "substriatus" collecting nesting material
[Eulah Creek, NSW, December 2016]

Striated Pardalote at the entrance of its nesting hollow in an ironbark eucalypt tree
[Eulah Creek, NSW, January 2008]

This Fairy Martin nest (the one with the bottle shape right at the centre) was re-used by a pair of Striated Pardalotes; an attempt to photograph a bird when entering or leaving failed due to bad light under the overhanging rock
[Dripping Rock, near Maules Creek, NSW, October 2011]

Striated Pardalotes can be very crafty when it comes to selecting the right nesting hollow (photo courtesy of C. Hayne)

Striated Pardalote entering its nesting hollow (photo courtesy of C. Hayne)

This Striated Pardalote is entering its nesting hollow in a vertical creek bank
[Near Narrabri, NSW, October 2014]

Striated Pardalote leaving its nest tunnel to dispose of a poo sac discharged by a chick (photo courtesy of L. Tonnochy)
[Near Townsville, QLD, August 2016]

Striated Pardalote bringing food for its chicks (photo courtesy of L. Tonnochy)
[Near Townsville, QLD, August 2016]

Eggs

"boyanga", "booyanga", "derinya", "dirandil", "koomura", "ngampu", "nooluk", "pateena" = Egg; "dirundirri" = eggs [Aboriginal]; "gawu" = eggs [gamilaraay]

Size:18 x 15 mm Colour: White Shape: Tapered oval

Behaviour

Social behaviour: Territorial Mobility: Migratory/dispersive Elementary unit: Pair

Food, Diet

Striated Pardalotes forage through the foliages of trees for small insects. They are often credited with the title "Saviour of the trees" and the photo below gives an example why - note the lerps the bird has in its bill.

Striated Pardalote with a good haul of lerps
[Eulah Creek, NSW, November 2010]

Striated Pardalote foraging in a eucaypt tree; its target are the white spots (lerps of psyllids )
[Narrabri Lake, NSW, May 2012]

Striated Pardalote looking around
[Narrabri Lake, NSW, May 2012]

Gotcha! Striated Pardalote with its prize
[Narrabri Lake, NSW, May 2012]

Two Striated Pardalotes seen by us looking for insects on the ground, under a tree infested with psyllids
[Eulah Creek, NSW, June 2012]

Striated Pardalote beating a caterpillar to death before devouring it (photo courtesy of A. Ross-Taylor)
[Highland Park, Gold Coast, June 2013]

Call(s)/Song

For this species we have recorded the following call(s)/song. The interpretation of their meaning is our own; comments and suggestions for improvement are welcome.

strpard_20140313_1.mp3 substriatus
(NW NSW)
Contact call © MD
strpard_20140313_2.mp3 substriatus
(NW NSW)
Contact calls © MD
strpard_20151008.mp3 substriatus
(NW NSW)
Alarm call? (human near nest) © MD
strpard_20141031.mp3 substriatus
(NW NSW)
Feeding calls © MD
strpard_20140313_3.mp3 substriatus
(NW NSW)
Feeding calls? © MD
strpard_20140324.mp3 substriatus
(NW NSW)
Feeding calls? Q&A © MD
strpard_20140925.mp3 substriatus
(NW NSW)
? © MD
 
strpard_art_20140410.mp3 melanocephalus
(SE QLD)
Contact calls © ART
strpard_20151003.mp3 melanocephalus
(NW NSW)
Contact calls © MD

These pages are largely based on our own observations and those of our contributors. The structure of these bird pages is explained HERE. For more salient facts on any bird species please refer to a field guide.

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