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23

Torresian Crow

(Corvus orru)
Alternate name(s): "Australian Crow", "Large-billed Crow", "Crow*", "Kelly*"
Size: 48-53 cm
Weight: 550 g (average)

Similar species

Description     Classification     Distribution     Sightings     Photos     Breeding     Nest     Eggs     Behaviour     Food     Call/s

Physical description

Click here for a physical description

Taxonomy, classification

See Torresian Crow at Wikipedia .

Range, habitat, finding this species

Click here for information on habitat and range

Sightings

Click here for sighting information

Photos

Race "cecilae"

ADULT

Close-up frontal portrait of a Torresian Crow (photo courtesy of J. Greaves)
[The Granites Gold Mine, inland NT, August 2015]

Close-up lateral view of the same Torresian Crow as shown above; here the bird's feathers are ruffled, exposing the WHITE underparts characteristic of crows [whereas ravens would have grey underparts] (photo courtesy of J. Greaves)
[The Granites Gold Mine, inland NT, August 2015]

Close-up frontal view of a Torresian Crow (photo courtesy of A. Ross-Taylor)
[Highland Park, Gold Coast, QLD, November 2013]

Frontal view of a cawing Torresian Crow (photo courtesy of A. Ross-Taylor)
[Highland Park, Gold Coast, QLD, November 2013]

Frontal view of a cawing Torresian Crow (photo courtesy of C. Hayne)
[Moree, NSW, October 2013]

Near-lateral view of a cawing Torresian Crow (photo courtesy of A. Ross-Taylor)
[South Stradbroke Island, QLD, January 2012]

Lateral view of a Torresian Crow on a strainer post (photo courtesy of L. Scott)
[Roseberry Creek Valley, near Toonumbar NP, northern NSW, November 2016]

Lateral view of a Torresian Crow
[Bunya Mountains NP, QLD, June 2017]

Lateral view of a Torresian Crow on the ground
[Eulah Creek, NSW, October 2013]

Near-dorsal view of a Torresian Crow on the ground
[Eulah Creek, NSW, October 2013]

Near-dorsal view of a Torresian Crow
[Moree, NSW, August 2012]

Two Torresian Crows on a strainer post (photo courtesy of L. Scott)
[Roseberry Creek Valley, near Toonumbar NP, northern NSW, November 2016]

Two Torresian Crows on a strainer post (photo courtesy of L. Scott)
[Roseberry Creek Valley, near Toonumbar NP, northern NSW, November 2016]

Near-frontal view of a Torresian Crow in flight
[Eulah Creek, NSW, October 2013]

Near-frontal view of a Torresian Crow in flight
[Eulah Creek, NSW, October 2013]

Lateral view of a Torresian Crow in flight
[Old Bar, NSW, July 2013]

Lateral view of a Torresian Crow in flight (photo courtesy of J. Greaves)
[Boolardy Station, Murchison, WA, August 2016]

Torresian Crow in flight, seen from underneath; identification was made by the squarish shape of the tail, which is different to the more rounded shape of an Australian Raven's tail; note also the absence of hackles on its throat
[Moree, NSW, August 2012]

IMMATURE/JUVENILE

Lateral view of a ragged-looking Torresian Crow; the pinkish gape may indicate that this is a young bird (photo courtesy of B. Hensen)
[Darwin, NT, August 2013]

Behaviour

Social behaviour: Communal Mobility: Sedentary/nomadic Elementary unit: Flock

Adult Torresian Crows tend to be sedentary, immature birds are nomadic.

Torresian Crows can be found in a variety of habitats, in this case in an estuary
[Urunga board walk, Urunga Heads, NSW, March 2015]

Food, Diet

Adults: Omnivore Dependents: ? Water intake: Daily?

Like all other members of the Corvus family, Torresian Crows are omnivores. They feed on carrion, dead fish, insects, fruit and food scraps. They have also learned to kill and feed on Cane Toads.

Call(s)/Song

For this species we have recorded the following call(s)/song. The interpretation of their meaning is our own; comments and suggestions for improvement are welcome.

torcrow_20160311.mp3 cecilae
(S QLD)
Contact calls ("cawing") © MD
torcrow_art_20131113.mp3 cecilae
(SE QLD)
Group Q&A © ART
torcrow_20160311_3.mp3 cecilae
(S QLD)
Raiding calls? (with
Pied Currawong)
© MD

These pages are largely based on our own observations and those of our contributors. The structure of these bird pages is explained HERE. For more salient facts on any bird species please refer to a field guide.

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