Aust birds    Bird names   News   1-26    Habitats    Key plants    Glossary    Plumage    Nests    Tips    Thumbnails    Gen. info    Sponsors    Photos for sale   
NON-PASSERINES     1    2    3    4    5    6    7    8    9    10     11     12     13     14 15     16     17     18     19     20     21     22     23     24     25     26     PASSERINES
Common names sorted alphabetically: A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   W   Y  

5

Black-necked Stork

(Ephippiorhynchus asiaticus)
Size: 1.1-1.3 m; wing span 1.9-2.2 m

Hunting technique

MALE

Here a sequence of photos showing a male Black-necked Stork observed by us hunting fish in shallow water.

Adult male Black-necked Stork moving in to go hunting
[Urunga board walk, Urunga Heads, NSW, August 2009]

It did not take the bird even 30 seconds to get moving; it was clear after seconds that it was not worried about the observer with a camera, but moved around at ease
[Urunga board walk, Urunga Heads, NSW, August 2009]

It started flapping its wings to intimidate fish in the shallow water
[Urunga board walk, Urunga Heads, NSW, August 2009]

This can look like a ballet dance at times
[Urunga board walk, Urunga Heads, NSW, August 2009]

See how big I am?!
[Urunga board walk, Urunga Heads, NSW, August 2009]

Then it stood ramrod-straight, fixing with its eyes one particular location in the water...
[Urunga board walk, Urunga Heads, NSW, August 2009]

...followed by one jab...
[Urunga board walk, Urunga Heads, NSW, August 2009]

...and here we go...
[Urunga board walk, Urunga Heads, NSW, August 2009]

Gotcha!
[Urunga board walk, Urunga Heads, NSW, August 2009]

FEMALE

The following sequence of photos was kindly contributed by B. Kinross. It shows a female Black-necked Stork that has developed a taste for eel.

Adult female Black-necked Stork (photo courtesy of B. Kinross)
[Beachmere, QLD, January 2016]

An eel is a slippery customer (photo courtesy of B. Kinross)
[Beachmere, QLD, January 2016]

It takes a bit of turning and manipulating... (photo courtesy of B. Kinross)
[Beachmere, QLD, January 2016]

... to finally have it in the right position... (photo courtesy of B. Kinross)
[Beachmere, QLD, January 2016]

... to go in head first (photo courtesy of B. Kinross)
[Beachmere, QLD, January 2016]

These pages are largely based on our own observations and those of our contributors. The structure of these bird pages is explained HERE. For more salient facts on any bird species please refer to a field guide.

Would you like to contribute photos or sound recordings to this site?
If interested, please CLICK HERE. Credits to contributors are given HERE.