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19

Arabian Babbler

(Turdoides squamiceps)
Alternate name(s): "Brown Babbler"
Size: 26-29 cm; wing span 31-33.5 cm
Weight: 64-83 g
Description     Classification     Distribution     Sightings     Photos     Breeding     Nest     Eggs     Behaviour     Food     Call/s

Physical description

Click here for a physical description

Taxonomy, classification

See Arabian Babbler at Wikipedia .

Range, habitat

Click here for information on habitat and range

Sightings

Click here for sighting information

Photos

ADULT

Sex unknown

Close-up, near-lateral view of an Arabian Babbler preening in an acacia shrub
[Campus of Sultan Qaboos University, near Muscat, March 2010]

Lateral view of an Arabian Babbler
[Campus of Sultan Qaboos University, near Muscat, March 2010]

Lateral view of an Arabian Babbler in shady conditions, making its colours look even more inconspicuous
[Campus of Sultan Qaboos University, near Muscat, March 2010]

Dorsal view of an Arabian Babbler foraging on the ground
[Campus of Sultan Qaboos University, near Muscat, March 2010]

Dorsal view of an Arabian Babbler foraging on the ground, now with its head turned
[Campus of Sultan Qaboos University, near Muscat, March 2010]

Family of Arabian Babblers, with a near-frontal view of one bird
[Campus of Sultan Qaboos University, near Muscat, December 2009]

When alarmed, the Arabian Babbler sentry's tail is raised
[Campus of Sultan Qaboos University, near Muscat, December 2009]

Behaviour

Several of the typical patterns of behaviour of babblers were observed by us, such as the tail being raised when excited or the "follow my leader" way of moving from one point to another in low flight. There is usually at least one sentry high up in an acacia while the others in the family forage on the ground nearby.

On the other hand, occasionally single birds were observed by us, which clearly had no sentry available while foraging on the ground. In such cases good camouflage helps (see below).

Arabian Babbler foraging under an acacia tree; can you see the bird?
[Campus of Sultan Qaboos University, near Muscat, May 2010]

Additional information

On a separate page we have lined up a series of shots of an Arabian Babbler trying to open a seedpod.

These pages are largely based on our own observations and those of our contributors. The structure of these bird pages is explained HERE. For more salient facts on any bird species please refer to a field guide.

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